About your Search

20130416
20130424
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6
[ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: any way jim so i'm saying to jacki schechner when she's in my bed yesterday morning along with a bunch of other people -- >> what? >> stephanie: i'm sorry the camera is on. >> along with a bunch of other people? [ laughter ] >> stephanie: little titillating. i had a dinner party saturday night and it had more to do with -- jacki, we all partied a little hardy. it was a big slumber party. >> very responsible in l.a. if you're going to consume too many adult beverages to make the decision not to drive so that's what we did. lucky enough, stephanie has a home that's decorated like a bed and breakfast and you can pick your room. >> stephanie: exactly. just saying. not what you thought. >> would you like the naked marilyn photograph room. would you like the country breakfast room? >> stephanie: all right. anyway, i was trying to get jim's attention. good morning jacki. thank god it was a slow "newsweek" last week. >> we have lily tomlin today. >> stephanie: here's jacki schechner. >> happy monday. governor deval patrick is asking massachusetts residents
are working around the clock in 12 hour shifts. days off are cancel. jim avila on how boston most celebrated event turned into a spectacle of blood and screaming. >> 2 hours after the winner crossed. 4 hours 9 minutes in the race amateur runners still filling boston street. 2 rapid fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up. [ screaming]. >>reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official calls a war zone. >> i crossed the 26 mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen and there was some commotion. i saw fire and smoke and i didn't know what it was and then from about me to where that gentlemen is standing over there i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash. fire. smok smoke. i just ran inside as fast as i koyshtion camera rolling from many angle as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least one of the marathoners. look again as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least one of the marathoners. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to sell brit the finish. >> bomb w
this fateing the initial fire. >>reporter: steve says his nephew jim was likely among those killed in wed explosion of the west, texas fert laser plant. >> town lick this with something like that going on, they react and when the he can completion happened. >> like all of west firefighters 52-year-old stef was volunteer with full-time job in town. in case at westec welding that makes firefighters equipment. >> hearing the become hit and everything went black and i just kind of crouched did you know. >>reporter: beside his nephew he also lost his home. >> big old boom. just i mean it was horrible. >> gene lives close to the nursing home that was destroyed kitty corner from the plant. how is your house. >> it's all, everything is, the inside is gone. ceilings and insulation laying on the floor. >>reporter: do you feel lick though that you got out. >> yes. lucky for my wife she was sitting in the living room on the couch and fell on top, the ceiling fell on top of her. >>reporter: he had to pull the mangled garage door off the car to get he and his wife out of the house to safety. am
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
that this is the law of the land and going forward i think you will see that. >> host: one question from jim. he writes i'm 62 in good health, why not just go without until something comes of? >> guest: one reason is you will have to pay a fine. it's low in the first year, only $95. it goes up in a few years to 2% of hearing, or $700 or if you sign up for coverage although people worry the penalties are too low. but like anyone, as my mother used to tell me don't go a day without health insurance. you never know when you are going to have a concussion and you never know when you're going to be in a car accident. is it really a risk you want to take? >> host: going to ted from huntington new york on our republican line. good morning, you're on with jenny gold. >> caller: good morning. i would like to know about the policy you're in new york. i want to move out of new york. can this policy follow me you know to another state? or if -- >> host: do you have to change policies with each state you are in? is that what you're asking? >> caller: yes. >> guest: the thing about this lot is it's a state-by-state
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6